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Etihad to offer full refund on all cancelled flights

tihad Airways will offer Australian passengers a full refund on all flights cancelled due to the Covid-19 pandemic, even if those travellers have already accepted a credit voucher.

The offer will be valid on all Etihad tickets purchased in Australia for any flight on the Etihad network. The airline has confirmed it will contact passengers who booked directly with the airline, as well as with Australian-based travel agents, to outline their options.

From 26 March 2020, Etihad’s published Covid-19 rebooking policy reportedly failed to identify that passengers were entitled to a refund for flights cancelled due to the pandemic.

The Australian Competition & Consumer Commission, which held discussions with Etihad over the issue, says the airline has now revised its policy by offering refunds to all consumers in Australia who purchased tickets, regardless of where their flight was scheduled to depart from.

ACCC Chair Rod Sims says that “Etihad’s revised policy, and its decision to also offer refunds to consumers who weren’t previously advised of their right to a refund, should serve as a model for other airlines.”

Etihad’s conditions of carriage, as published on Etihad’s website at the time, provided that  if Etihad failed to operate a flight reasonably according to schedule, Etihad would, at the consumer’s option, either:

  • provide a refund to the consumer for the unused portion of their fare;
  • fly the consumer to their destination on the earliest available Etihad service, without additional charge; or
  • make arrangements to re-route the consumer to their destination on either an Etihad service or another carrier’s service within a reasonable period of time, and refund the difference in cost if the alternative transport is cheaper.

“The protections of the Australian Consumer Law, which extend to all corporations carrying on business in Australia, prohibit making false or misleading representations about a consumer’s right to a refund, including their contractual refund rights,” Sims said.

“Consumers who believe they are entitled to a refund because they booked their fare while in Australia and who are not contacted by Etihad or their Australian travel agent by 7 August 2020, should contact the business that sold them their ticket.”

David

David Flynn

David Flynn is the Editor-in-Chief of Executive Traveller and a bit of a travel tragic with a weakness for good coffee, shopping and lychee martinis.More stories on:ETIHAD AIRWAYSCORONAVIRUSShare this article:Subscribe to our newsletterSUBMIT4 CommentsSort by : Oldest 

freebo

freebo

I booked an Etihad flight to the UK via Virgin Australia and the return leg got cancelled by Etihad leaving me stranded and having to spend big on an alternative to get home.

VA have refused to refund us. Does this change that? This was business and the original ticket cost about $7,000.Tuesday, 28 Jul 2020, 11:49:07 am 1  0  0  

thibault

thibault

My understanding is that as you booked via Virgin, you need to discuss with Virgin.
Etihad has nothing to do with it unless you were booked on their ticket stock (607) on an EY flight number.Tuesday, 28 Jul 2020, 01:41:07 pm 1  0  0  

Peterkevingray

Peterkevingray

We have had no problem REQUESTING our refund for BNE -CDG flights but our TA has said it will take 12 weeks for Etihad to refund! How does that work? Bizarre?Tuesday, 28 Jul 2020, 07:00:07 pm 0  0  0  

Plane Crazy

Plane Crazy

Can someone please explain how Etihad and Qantas are required to offer refunds in this situation yet Virgin Australia refuse to offer anything but useless “conditional credits” valid for a matter of a month on a limited network for the flights they cancel? Is it related to their voluntary administration? If so, then why does AMEX deny my charge back request for these flights? I thought AMEX had protection in these circumstances either via insurance or funds held in trust until the service had been provided by virgin.

I’ve neither been offered alternate means to my destination or adequate compensation yet both Virgin and AMEX think that’s fine.Wednesday, 29 Jul 2020, 10:45:07 am 0  0  0  


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Emirates, Etihad passengers must take a Covid-19 test before flying

As of August 1 it’s a case of “no test, no ticket”, regardless of if you’re headed to the UAE or in transit to another country.By David Flynn, July 29 2020Share this article:

Emirates, Etihad passengers must take a Covid-19 test before flying

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Passengers on Emirates and Etihad Airways will need to show a negative Covid-19 test result before they’re allowed to fly, in accordance with strict new rules introduced by the UAE.

The requirement comes into force on August 1 and applies to any traveller regardless of if they’re transiting through the airline’s Dubai and Abu Dhabi hubs, or if the UAE is their final destination.

Although most Australians are prohibited from leaving the country, those who qualify for an exemption and plan to travel on either of the Gulf airlines will need to visit an airline-authorised testing centre within 96 hours of their flight (exemptions will be made for children under 12 and anybody with “moderate to severe disabilities”).

While this system is already in place for travellers from a dozen countries, as of August 1 it will be expanded to every passenger on every Emirates or Etihad flight, with a printed copy of your negative test result being shown at the airport check-in desk: no test, no ticket.

Emirates advises that “if the UAE government has specified a designated laboratory in your country of origin, then you must get your certificate from that lab,” and links to an online list which at the time of writing doesn’t include any Australian test centres. “If it is not specified, please use an accredited lab in your country of departure,” the airline continues, without fully specifying what an “accredited lab” means.

The Etihad website says that passengers “must arrange your test with a Pure Health medical facility if there are approved clinics in your country of departure – test results from other clinics will not be accepted. If there are no approved Pure Health facilities in your city or country of departure, please refer to our list of locally approved medical clinics to arrange your COVID-19 PCR test.”

As previously reported, Emirates now offers “COVID-19 cover” to its Australian travellers, although this doesn’t include the cost of government-required quarantine measures.

Also read: Australian travel ban exemptions prove easy for some, hard for too many

David

David Flynn

David Flynn is the Editor-in-Chief of Executive Traveller and a bit of a travel tragic with a weakness for good coffee, shopping and lychee martinis.More stories on:EMIRATESETIHAD AIRWAYSCORONAVIRUSShare this article:Subscribe to our newsletterSUBMITNo commentsSort by : Oldest 


Hi Guest, join in the discussion on Emirates, Etihad passengers must take a Covid-19 test before flyingPOST

Executive TravellerLivereeves35 replied to New forecast says air travel won’t hit pre-pandemic levels u…reeves35 replied to BA spikes Sydney flights until at least October 2020kimshep replied to Why a second American carrier for Oneworld?Sibelius liked Mournful Musings of a Melancholy Melburnian…XWu replied to BA spikes Sydney flights until at least October 2020airADL replied to Mournful Musings of a Melancholy Melburnian…Rufus1 replied to London City Airport is finally getting loungesregular flyer replied to BA spikes Sydney flights until at least October 2020Plane Crazy replied to Etihad to offer full refund on all cancelled flightsLostInTransit replied to Former Virgin Australia CEO joins supersonic startup Spikedeanr replied to Qantas Club lounge, BroomeGrannular replied to Singapore Airlines’ Vistara reveals A321neo lie-flat busines…Grannular liked Why a second American carrier for Oneworld?Scotty90 replied to Former Virgin Australia CEO joins supersonic startup SpikeDavid replied to Virgin Australia to exit Bowen Hills for Flight Centre’s Sou…s4077786 replied to Virgin Australia to exit Bowen Hills for Flight Centre’s Sou…ayush replied to Singapore Airlines’ Vistara reveals A321neo lie-flat busines…Eli replied to Former Virgin Australia CEO joins supersonic startup SpikeEli replied to Singapore Airlines’ Vistara reveals A321neo lie-flat busines…sid replied to London City Airport is finally getting loungesBoeing-Tragic replied to London City Airport is finally getting loungesnigelwilliams replied to London City Airport is finally getting loungesDanielPark liked Why a second American carrier for Oneworld?UpUpAndAway replied to Former Virgin Australia CEO joins supersonic startup SpikePeterkevingray replied to Etihad to offer full refund on all cancelled flightsJohn Phelan replied to Qantas Club lounge, BroomeJohn Phelan liked Why a second American carrier for Oneworld?GoYouBlues replied to Virgin Australia to exit Bowen Hills for Flight Centre’s Sou…reeves35 replied to Former Virgin Australia CEO joins supersonic startup SpikeDanV replied to Virgin Australia to depart Sydney and become 100% Brisbane-b…Sibelius liked Why a second American carrier for Oneworld?

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Hawaiian Airlines delays Boeing 787-9 debut to 2022-2023

The arrival of Hawaiian’s new Boeing 787s, and its new business class, could be three years away…By David Flynn, July 29 2020Share this article:

Hawaiian Airlines delays Boeing 787-9 debut to 2022-2023

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Hawaiian Airlines doesn’t expect its first Boeing 787-9 jets to take wing until 2022 or 2023, following discussions with Boeing to “re-pace” the delivery of those Dreamliners in light of reduced demand and cash constraints.

“We have continued to have productive discussions with Boeing to re-pace our 787 order,” airline president and CEO Peter Ingram noted this morning during a conference call on Hawaiian’s Q2 2020 earnings, which he said reflected “the continued impact of COVID-19 and State of Hawai’i quarantines on our business.”

“While not finalised, we do not expect to put the first two 787s into service until 2022 or 2023.”Hawaiian Airlines’ Boeing 787 business class seat will be based on Adient Aerospace’s Ascent.

Hawaiian Airlines has ten Boeing 787-9s on order, with with purchase rights for ten more, with the intent of them replacing the older Airbus A330-200s. It previously planned to begin flying the Dreamliner in early 2021 with deliveries stretching through to 2025.

When those Boeing 787-9s do arrive, they could also help Hawaiian forge new non-stop routes. “The Boeing 787 gives us many interesting possibilities such as London and Perth,” Ingram has previously remarked.Hawaiian Airlines’ Boeing 787 business class seat will be based on Adient Aerospace’s Ascent.

The fuel-efficient Dreamliner will serve as the launchpad for Hawaiian’s new lie-flat business class seat, designed by Adient Aerospace, which is part owned by Boeing. Hawaiian Airlines’ Boeing 787 business class seat will be based on Adient Aerospace’s Ascent.

This is an evolved version of Adient’s original Ascent business class seat concept, as shown below.Hawaiian Airlines’ Boeing 787 business class seat will be based on Adient Aerospace’s Ascent.

The customisable Ascent can come with or without privacy doors, as well as wireless device charging – Hawaiian hasn’t revealed if it ticked those boxes on the order form.Hawaiian Airlines’ Boeing 787 business class seat will be based on Adient Aerospace’s Ascent.

A panel between the middle seats can however be lowered, even if the beds run at angles to one another rather than snugly side by side.Hawaiian Airlines’ Boeing 787 business class seat will be based on Adient Aerospace’s Ascent.

Hawaiian Airlines will also be styling the Ascent to suit its own more tropical palette.

While Hawaiian Airlines will be Adient’s launch customer for the Ascent, the seat maker is also shopping around its new Aspect business class design, which brings a fully flat bed and direct aisle access to single-aisle jets, which are expected to become more popular in the post-pandemic travel era.

“As the market returns we think it only accelerates that [shift] and points towards narrow-body aircraft becoming very prevalent in future,” Adient Aerospace CEO Andy Masson notes.

David

David Flynn

David Flynn is the Editor-in-Chief of Executive Traveller and a bit of a travel tragic with a weakness for good coffee, shopping and lychee martinis.More stories on:BUSINESS CLASSBOEING 787 DREAMLINERHAWAIIAN AIRLINESShare this article:Subscribe to our newsletterSUBMITNo commentsSort by : Oldest 


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Executive TravellerLivereeves35 replied to New forecast says air travel won’t hit pre-pandemic levels u…reeves35 replied to BA spikes Sydney flights until at least October 2020kimshep replied to Why a second American carrier for Oneworld?Sibelius liked Mournful Musings of a Melancholy Melburnian…XWu replied to BA spikes Sydney flights until at least October 2020airADL replied to Mournful Musings of a Melancholy Melburnian…Rufus1 replied to London City Airport is finally getting loungesregular flyer replied to BA spikes Sydney flights until at least October 2020Plane Crazy replied to Etihad to offer full refund on all cancelled flightsLostInTransit replied to Former Virgin Australia CEO joins supersonic startup Spikedeanr replied to Qantas Club lounge, BroomeGrannular replied to Singapore Airlines’ Vistara reveals A321neo lie-flat busines…Grannular liked Why a second American carrier for Oneworld?Scotty90 replied to Former Virgin Australia CEO joins supersonic startup SpikeDavid replied to Virgin Australia to exit Bowen Hills for Flight Centre’s Sou…s4077786 replied to Virgin Australia to exit Bowen Hills for Flight Centre’s Sou…ayush replied to Singapore Airlines’ Vistara reveals A321neo lie-flat busines…Eli replied to Former Virgin Australia CEO joins supersonic startup SpikeEli replied to Singapore Airlines’ Vistara reveals A321neo lie-flat busines…sid replied to London City Airport is finally getting loungesBoeing-Tragic replied to London City Airport is finally getting loungesnigelwilliams replied to London City Airport is finally getting loungesDanielPark liked Why a second American carrier for Oneworld?UpUpAndAway replied to Former Virgin Australia CEO joins supersonic startup SpikePeterkevingray replied to Etihad to offer full refund on all cancelled flightsJohn Phelan replied to Qantas Club lounge, BroomeJohn Phelan liked Why a second American carrier for Oneworld?GoYouBlues replied to Virgin Australia to exit Bowen Hills for Flight Centre’s Sou…reeves35 replied to Former Virgin Australia CEO joins supersonic startup SpikeDanV replied to Virgin Australia to depart Sydney and become 100% Brisbane-b…Sibelius liked Why a second American carrier for Oneworld?

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Virgin Galactic reveals its ‘outer space class’ seat

The great unknown, and creature comforts made to suit, lure would-be astronauts with US$250,000 to spend.By Bloomberg News, July 29 2020Share this article:

Virgin Galactic reveals its 'outer space class' seat

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When you’re in the space-tourism business, spacious windows are essential. As are ample “astronaut float zones” coupled with a bevy of cameras to supply one’s social media accounts – the better to impress friends.

Virgin Galactic has all these covered in the cabin of its VSS Unity, which it unveiled Tuesday in a virtual media tour designed to evoke the same upscale aesthetic Virgin Group has pursued for its commercial airlines, airport lounges, hotels and planned cruise line.

Virgin Galactic plans to lean heavily on mood lighting, too – a feature that Virgin Atlantic pioneered on its long-haul flights. At certain points, all the lights will be switched off.

“At the pinnacle of the experience, as the Earth comes into view against the black sky of space, all lighting is extinguished, bringing an instant focus to the profoundly beautiful vista,” Virgin Galactic said.

The VSS Unity’s cabin has a dozen windows to offer plentiful vistas of the Earth, as well as 16 cameras to capture both videos and still images as souvenirs. Seatback screens provide flight data and a communications system for astronaut-passengers to speak with the pilots up front.

Those pilots will be able to recline all six passenger seats to help them better manage the forces of gravity, which can reach four times that of the Earth’s surface, on ascent and re-entry.

This movement also “frees up cabin space to maximize an unrestricted astronaut float zone when in zero gravity,” the company said.

Virgin Galactic calls its spacecraft cabin the “centerpiece” of the experience it’s selling for those able to afford tickets that cost upwards of US$250,000.

The interior space offers each customer “safety without distraction, quietly absorbing periods of sensory intensity and offering each astronaut a level of intimacy required for personal discovery and transformation.”

The company has said it intends to fly its first customers into space later this year. Ahead of that milestone, Virgin Galactic last week installed a Walt Disney customer-experience veteran as its new chief executive and has gradually ramped up marketing efforts to tout space joyrides as the ultimate journey for rich adventure seekers.Richard Branson with a model of the LauncherOne rocket from the window of Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShipTwo at the Farnborough International Air Show in the U.K. in 2012.

“When we created Virgin Galactic, we started with what we believed would be an optimal customer experience, and then built the spaceship around it,” British entrepreneur and Virgin founder Richard Branson said.

The VSS Unity reaches space not from a launch pad, but from a larger aircraft.

At or above 45,000 feet, the carrier plane drops the spacecraft, which then ignites its rocket engine, propelling its two pilots and six passengers to an altitude of more than 68 miles above the Earth, which according to NASA, is technically “space.”

The long journey to commercial flight stretches back to 2004, when Branson founded Virgin Galactic. Arguably the pioneer in the field, his dream was dealt a deadly setback in October 2014, when a test pilot was killed during a flight in California. The tragedy informed major redesign work over the next six years.

Virgin Galactic plans to fly five spaceships in coming years and to expand internationally. The profundity for space tourists, however, will be rather brief. Customers will experience 10-15 minutes of weightlessness during the 30-minute flight before the ship glides to a return in southern New Mexico. At least there’ll be champagne and hors d’oeuvre awaiting them when they return…

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